MN Cancer Clinical Trials Network

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Announcing the creation of a new multi-site cancer clinical trials network across Minnesota, funded by the MN legislature as a part of the University of Minnesota's overall MnDRIVE Strategic Investment Request.

Nearly half of all Minnesotans will be diagnosed with a potentially life-threatening cancer during their lifetimes; one out of four Minnesotans die of cancer, and cancer is the leading cause of death in our state.[1]  To impact these grim statistics, local healthcare providers need equitable knowledge of cutting edge cancer research as well as access to the full menu of options for patient care.  Improving access to cancer clinical trials is one way to advance in this area.  However, clinical trials are currently concentrated in the metro area and Rochester, and distance from a clinical trial site is a limiting factor for a patient’s ability to access potentially life-saving new drugs and therapies.

The network will be led by the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota. It will bring cancer prevention and treatment trials from the Masonic Cancer Center, Hormel Institute, and the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center to medical centers and local healthcare providers across the state, stengthening the work of the Metro-Minnesota Community Oncology Research Consortium (MMCORC) and the Essentia Health NCI Community Oncology Research Program (Essentia Health NCORP), who provide access to clinical trials in the communities of Duluth and the Twin Cities Metro.

By increasing patient access to these lifesaving and life changing therapies and treatments, the University and its partners will impact population health, strengthen health care systems, create more equitable access to care, and improve cancer outcomes throughout the state. Improvements in cancer outcomes are completely dependent on providers’ knowledge of the disease and their ability to access cutting edge options for care as well as researchers’ ability to conduct additional clinical trials.  Support of this program will allow more Minnesotans to participate in clinical trials with the expected goal of improving cancer outcomes.  

More information coming soon.