Frequently Asked Questions

Three hands raised in the air with question marks above themThinking of participating in the 10,000 Families Study?

Here you will find the answers to your most pressing questions. 

Download the complete FAQ

Contact us

Call
612-625-3910
1-866-434-9879 

Email
Tenkfs@umn.edu

Why am I being contacted?

Why am I being contacted?

You may be eligible to participate in a research study—the 10,000 Families Study—at the University of Minnesota. We are contacting you because you volunteered, or you were randomly selected from lists of people living in Minnesota, or because you have a relative who is already participating in the study. We are inviting you to participate in a pilot study that will inform a large family-based cohort study being done all across Minnesota.

What is a cohort study?

What is a cohort study?

A cohort study is where a large group of individuals is enrolled and then regularly followed for many years to learn about changes in health over time. Using this type of design, researchers can more accurately determine what exposures and lifestyle factors impact health later in life.

At enrollment into a cohort study, participants complete questionnaires and health assessments to provide information on where people live, what they eat, how much they exercise, whether they smoke, genetic factors, and other factors that may influence disease risks later in life.

What is a pilot study?

What is a pilot study?

A pilot study is a smaller study done to test feasibility, time, and cost of doing a study and to learn about unexpected results. Pilot studies are important because they allow researchers to improve study procedures and participant experiences before a large cohort study is conducted.

What is a family-based study?

What is a family-based study?

A family-based study includes at least two biological relatives from at least two different generations from each participating family. Family-based studies can help us understand how genetics and environment contribute to health and disease. Family-based studies also look at factors that may be important to health across generations.

What can be learned from this kind of study?

What can be learned from this kind of study?

Studies similar to the 10,000 Families Study have helped our understanding of many conditions, diseases, and risk factors that arise in birth, childhood, and adult years, into old age. We are starting a new Minnesota family-based study because we want to use new, modern tools that will hep us understand why some people stay healthy and others develop heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and other related diseases in adulthood. Multigenerational studies are important because some risk factors are experienced by more than one generation in a family due to inheritance or experiences shared by family members.

If I participate what would I be asked to do?

If I participate what would I be asked to do?

You will be asked to:

  • Complete health questionnaires either on paper or on-line;
  • Invite at least one other family member (if you are the FIRST family member to participate in the study) from a different generation to participate;
  • Attend a family health fair where we will take measurements and biological samples (see reverse side for a list).
  • Allow your blood sample to be tested for DNA (and if one or more of your children under age 18 participate, allow their saliva to be tested);
  • Give permission for release of hospital and clinic records related to cancer, heart disease, and any other diseases or surgeries you might have had;
  • Allow researchers to link information from state cancer registries or similar systems about diseases you may have had or may develop in the future;
  • Agree to be contacted on a regular basis (e.g., annually) to obtain updates on your health.