Masonic Cancer Center

A comprehensive cancer center designated by the National Cancer Institute

Tumor Microenvironment

About the Tumor Microenvironment Program

AHCMCC2 - Image - 180x272 - Kalpna GuptaAHCMCC2 - Image - 180x272 - James McCarthyProgram Leaders:

Kalpna Gupta, Ph.D.
James McCarthy, Ph.D.

The Tumor Microenvironment (TME) Program is a new research program that incorporates members of the former Women's Cancer Program and some members of the Genetic Mechanisms of Cancer Program. The program consists of 34 members, representing the University of Minnesota's medical school, Institute of Engineering and Medicine (IEM), Center for Magnetic Resonance Research (CMRR), College of Veterinary Medicine, and School of Dentistry; the Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC); and the Hormel Institute.

TME program members seek to define critical molecular and cellular mechanisms through which alterations in the tumor microenvironment contribute to tumor-related factors in malignant progression. The program is organized in three distinct but overlapping themes that have the potential to impact tumor progression in several ways, including reducing tumor burden, limiting metastasis, and lessening cancer-induced pain, all of which affect morbidity and mortality in cancer patients.

Research themes: 

  • Mechanisms of cancer-associated pain
  • Critical cellular interactions in the tumor microenvironment that facilitate malignant progression
  • Key molecular interactions critical in invasion and therapeutic resistance
Program Meeting Schedule
    Research Program Members
  • AHCMCC - Image - 70x80 -  Bazzaro_Martina

    mbazzaro@umn.edu
    612-626-3111

    Martina Bazzaro, Ph.D.
    Development of targeted therapies for treatment of ovarian and HPV-associated cervical cancer; development and characterization of new biomarkers for early-detection ovarian cancer; identification and characterization of molecules associated with ovarian cancer development and progression; the role of angiogenesis in ovarian cancer progression

    AHCMCC2 - Image - 70x80 - Alvin Beitz

    beitz001@umn.edu
    612-625-2595

    Alvin Beitz, Ph.D.
    Mechanisms of cancer pain and the mechanisms of underlying tumor metastasis

    AHCMCC2 - Image - 70x80 - Mohammad Saleem Bhat

    msbhat@hi.umn.edu
    507-437-9662

    Mohammad Saleem Bhat, Ph.D.
    Understanding the biochemical, cellular, and molecular processes crucial for the development of prostate and pancreatic cancer; identification of potential agents that could be used to treat and prevent cancer in humans

    AHCMCC - Image - 70x80 -  Bischof_John

    bischof@umn.edu
    612-625-5513

    John Bischof, Ph.D.
    Thermal biology and nanotechnology to develop novel therapies to treat cancer

    AHCMCC - Image - 70x80 -  Clohisy_Denis

    clohi001@umn.edu
    612-273-8032

    Denis Clohisy, M.D.
    Role of the bone marrow microenvironment in bone metastasis; novel approaches for delivery tumor therapeutics to the bone marrow microenvironment

    sdconner@umn.edu
    612-625-3707

    Sean Connor, Ph.D.
    Understanding the relationship between human health and integral membrane protein transport within cells with a focus in 3 areas: 1) mechanisms that govern Notch trafficking and signaling; 2) regulation of LDL receptor transport and maintaining robust cholesterol clearance from circulation; and 3) relationship between integrin recycling, cell adhesion, metastasis, and cell survival

    AHCMCC2 - Image - 70x80 - Erin Dickerso

    edickers@umn.edu
    612-626-5053

    Erin Dickerson, Ph.D.
    Targeted therapy using peptides in conjunction with novel delivery approaches; development of targeted delivery strategies that overcome drug resistance of tumors and strategies that target the drivers of tumor formation and maintenance

    AHCMCC2 - Image - 70x80 - William Elmquist

    elmqu011@umn.edu
    612-625-0097

    William Elmquist, Ph.D.
    Biochemical and physiological determinants of drug absorption, distribution, and elimination with a focus on brain tumors

    AHCMCC - Image - 70x80 -  Garwood_Michael

    gar@cmrr.umn.edu
    612-626-2001

    Michael Garwood, Ph.D.
    Developing advanced MRI and MRS spectroscopy techniques to study tissue function, metabolism and microstructure to better understand the unique functional and molecular properties of cancer, and to improve the clinical management of the disease

    AHCMCC2 - Image - 70x80 - Edward Greeno

    green048@umn.edu
    612-624-0123

    Edward Greeno, M.D.
    Clinical management of gastrointestinal malignancies

    AHCMCC - Image - 70x80 - Gupta_Kalpna

    gupta014@umn.edu
    612-625-7648

    Kalpna Gupta, Ph.D.
    Opioid/opioid receptor signaling in endothelium leading to preclinical and translational studies to investigate the role of opioids and opioid receptor antagonists in angiogenesis, cancer progression and metastasis; basic and translational studies to prevent this inadvertent effect of opioids without compromising analgesia

    AHCMCC - Image - 70x80 - Gupta_Pankaj

    gupta013@umn.edu
    612-467-4135

    Pankaj Gupta, M.D.
    The role of proteglycans in stem cell niche formation; association of opioid use with clinical outcomes in prostate cancer, including cancer progression and survival

    AHCMCC2 - Image - 70x80 - Bin He

    binhe@umn.edu
    612-626-1115

    Bin He, Ph.D.
    Application of functional electrencephalography, thermography and fMRI to the detection of physiologically relevant signals such as pain and normal and tumor cell migration

    AHCMCC - Image - 70x80 -  Hebbel_Robert

    hebbe001@umn.edu
    612-624-0123

    Robert Hebbel, M.D.
    Vascular pathobiology of sickle disease; use of blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOEC) for biomedical applications that permits use of these cells to survey global endothelial gene expression and to evaluate their relevance in cancer angiogenesis and as a target for therapeutic delivery

    AHCMCC2 - Image - 70x80 - Betsy Kren

    krenx001@umn.edu
    612-625-8999

    Betsy Kren, Ph.D.
    The role of mitochondrial antioxidant pathways dysregulation in the initiation and progression hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as EMT transition. Use of cancer-cell specific targeted nanocapsules with RNAi cargos targeting essential survival proteins in redox and signaling pathways to treat HCC, with particular emphasis on killing the cancer stem cell or tumor initiating population

    AHCMCC2 - Image - 70x80 - Danni Li

    dannili@umn.edu
    612-626-0299

    Danni Li, Ph.D.
    Carbohydrate modified proteins as clinical diagnostics; cancer biomarkers, proteomics, assay development

    AHCMCC2 - Image - Emil_Lou 70x80

    emil-lou@umn.edu
    612-625-1110
     

    Emil Lou, M.D., Ph.D.
    Investigation of tumor heterogeneity and intercellular communication in a spectrum of invasive and aggressive solid tumor malignancies; biology of cancer cells as they relate to cancer cell invasion, progression, tumor recurrence, and chemotherapy resistance; the role of TnTs as an important mode of intercellular communication in cancer and in tumor-stromal cross-talk in the complex and heterogeneous tumor microenvironment.

    MEDSURG2 - Image - Size 1 - Maddaus, Michael Image

    madda001@umn.edu
    612-625-0998

    Michael Maddaus, M.D.
    Impact of lung cancer lymph node micrometastasis on patient outcome; development of technologies to evaluate the efficacy of minimally invasive surgery in cancer

    AHCMCC2 - Image - 70x80 - Kevin Mayo

    mayox001@umn.edu
    612-625-9968

    Kevin Mayo, Ph.D.
    Molecular structural characterization using NMR for the development of anti-angiogenic therapies; development of molecules that disrupt tumor angiogenesis and extracellular glycoproteins important in tumor migration and adhesion

    AHCMCC - Image - 70x80 -  McCarthy_James

    mccar001@umn.edu
    612-625-7454

    James McCarthy, Ph.D.
    Changes in the relationships between tumor cells and the surrounding extracellular matrix in tumor progression and metastasis, focusing on melanoma and prostate cancer; hyaluronan synthesis in prostate tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis to bone and other organs

    AHCMCC2 - Image - 70x80 - Greg Metzger

    gmetzger@cmrr.umn.edu
    612-626-2001

    Gregory Metzger, Ph.D.
    Development of a prostate imaging program at the Center for Magnetic Resonance Research with the initial goal to investigate the potential of magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy to noninvasively determine the extent and aggressiveness of prostate cancer in clinical studies

    AHCMCC - Image - 70x80 -  Nakato_Hiroshi

    nakat003@umn.edu
    612-625-1727

    Hiroshi Nakato, Ph.D.
    Function of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPFs) in development using a genetically tractable model organism, Drosophila melanogaster

    AHCMCC - Image - 70x80 -  Odde_David

    oddex002@umn.edu
    612-626-9980

    David Odde, Ph.D.
    Cellular and molecular bioengineering in cancer

    AQHCMCC2 - Image - Brenda Ogle 70x80

    ogle@umn.edu
    612-624-5948
     

    Brenda Ogle, Ph.D.
    Mechanisms of stem cell differenatiation; generation oif new technologies that advance stem cell biology and promote translation of stem cell research into clinical practice

    AQHCMCC2 - Image -Valerie Pierre 70x80

    pierre@umn.edu

    Valerie Pierre, Ph.D.
    Role of metal ions in biological systems and design metal complexes as biological and medical probes; development of lanthanide complexes as responsive luminescent sensors for nucleotides, and iron oxide nanoparticles as contrast agents for medical MRI.

    AHCMCC2 - Image - 70x80 - Paolo Provenzano

    pprovenz@umn.edu
    612-624-3279

    Paolo Provenzano, Ph.D.
    Molecular mechanisms by which the stromal extracellular matrix and stromal cell populations influence epithelial cell behavior in cancer; understanding the complex interactions of biochemical factors, matrix architecture and matrix mechanical properties especially as they pertain to progression in breast and pancreatic cancer

    AHCMCC2 - Image - 70x80 - Sundaram Ramakrishnan

    sunda001@umn.edu
    612-626-6461

    Sundaram Ramakrishnan, Ph.D.
    Biology of human ovarian cancer and the development of therapeutic strategies for the selective elimination of tumor cells; potential of targeting toxin molecules to tumor cells by linking them to specific MABs using recombinant DNA methods to improve cytotoxicity, increase the half-life of conjugates in circulation, and achieve better tumor localization and penetration.

    AHCMCC - Image - 70x80 -  Schwertfeger_Kaylee

    schwe251@umn.edu
    612-626-9419

    Kaylee Schwertfeger, Ph.D.
    Mechanisms through which infiltrating inflammatory cells and their soluble mediators contribute to mammary tumor formation

    AHCMCC2 - Image - 70x80 - Virginia Seybold

    vseybold@umn.edu
    612-624-9406

    Virginia Seybold, Ph.D.
    The study of tumor and neural cell interactions that evoke sensory activation and the investigation of strategies to enhance the analgesic ability of the endogenous cannabinoid system to attenuate cancer pain.

    AHCMCC2 - Image - 70x80 - Donald Simone

    simon003@umn.edu
    612-625-6464

    Donald Simone, Ph.D.
    Mechanisms of cancer pain associated with bone metastasis and chemotherapy-induced neuropathy

    AHCMCC - Image - 70x80 -  Skubitz_Amy

    skubi002@umn.edu
    612-625-5920

    Amy Skubitz, Ph.D.
    Basic mechanisms associated in ovarian cancer spread, and the interactions of beta-1 integrin subunits and CD44 on the surfaces of ovarian carcinoma cells and mesothelial cells; identification of biomarkers that can be used for detection and prognosis of ovarian cancer

    AHCMCC - Image - 70x80 -  Song_Chang

    songx001@umn.edu
    612-626-6852

    Chang Song, Ph.D.
    The role of microenvironmental blood flow, p02 and pH in tumor treatment; effect of radiation and hyperthermia on tumor physiology; chemical radiosensitization and radioprotection; molecular mechanism of apoptosis caused by radiation, drugs and heat shock

    titus004@umn.edu
    612-625-8498

    Margaret Titus, Ph.D.
    The role of unconventional myosins in cell migration

    AHCMCC - Image - 70x80 -  Vallera_Daniel

    valle001@umn.edu
    612-626-6664

    Daniel Vallera, Ph.D.
    Development of novel anticancer therapeutics focusing on the genetic engineering of cancer biologicals as alternative therapies for drug refractory cancer

    AHCMCC2 - Image - 70x80 - J.T. Vaughan

    tommy@cmrr.umn.edu
    612-626-2001

    J. Thomas Vaughan, Ph.D.
    Development of ultrahigh field magnetic resonance techniques and technology for biomedical applications;coil and circuits design for radio frequency (RF) field generation and reception; modeling and measurement of RF field propagation and losses in the human anatomy;
    advancing the state-of-the-art in neurological, cardiac, and breast imaging through high field NMR

    wilso042@umn.edu
    612-467-2810

    Michael Wilson, Ph.D.
    How cell surface proteolysis modulates the tumor microenvironment to facilitate cancer growth, invasion, and metastasis

    AHCMCC2 - Image - 70x80 - David Wood

    dkwood@umn.edu
    612-624-1438

    David Wood, Ph.D.
    Development of in vitro tumor models that incorporate key microenvironmental cues that affect tumor development as well as the unique vascular architecture to better understand the process of metastasis - how cancer cells spread through the vasculature from one site to another,  as well as how nanoparticles carrying chemotherapeutics or gene silencing siRNA, re most efficiently delivered to a tumor.

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  • Last modified on July 21, 2014