Masonic Cancer Center

A comprehensive cancer center designated by the National Cancer Institute

Events and Community Outreach

The Masonic Cancer Center includes notice of scientific meetings, seminars, and conferences that may be of interest to cancer researchers. We also invite members of the public to events, workshops, and community outreach resources.

Scientific Meetings
  • February 9, 2016: Tobacco Research Studies Meeting

    2 p.m., room 105, 717 Delaware St. SE
    Building tobacco research capacity in India: A critical resource for cancer prevention and
    tobacco control efforts
    Irina Stepanov, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Division of Environmental Health Sciences
    School of Public Health, University of Minnesota

    Samir Khariwala, M.D., Associate Professor, Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Minnesota

    We will discuss progress and challenges of our work on setting up a clinical site and analytical
    laboratory in Mumbai. Currently, this resource is being used to investigate the relationship between tobacco carcinogen exposure and risk of oral cancer in India. Future biomarker‐based research opportunities utilizing this resource will also be discussed.

  • February 10, 2016: Cancer Biology Research Club

    12-1 p.m., 2-115 CCRB
    Investigating PR/PELP1 cross-talk in breast cancer
    Katherine Leehy, Ph.D., Cancer Biology Training Grant postdoctoral fellow, Lange lab

  • February 12, 2016: Pre-application webinar for 2016 Pilot Grants in Health Disparities Research

    8-10 a.m.

    Register on the website. http://bit.ly/1KByoMa

  • February 15, 2016: Chemical Biology Colloquium

    12:15 p.m., room 105, 717 Delaware St. SE
    PROTACS: Induced protein degradation as a therapeutic strategy
    Craig Crews, Lewis B. Cullman Professor, Department Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, Chemistry and Pharmacology, Yale University

  • February 15, 2016: Advancing Your Research with CTSI Expertise – A special all-AHC faculty conversation

    4-6 p.m., Mississippi Room, Coffman Memorial Union
    Learn how the Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) is advancing forward, and how CTSI's funding programs and expert resources can help bring your discoveries into practice. This informal event is for University researchers and will provide information on how best to use CTSI to advance your research projects and careers.

    The event will include networking time, an informational program with a question and answer segment, and will conclude with expanded networking time to follow-up with presenters and connect with research colleagues.

    The presentation portion of the event will be live streamed for faculty members outside the Twin Cities Metro area, and a recording will be available for those who cannot attend.

    Hors 'd'oeuvres and refreshments will be served. More information and registration details will soon be added to CTSI’s website.

  • February 26, 2016: Forum on Ethical Issues in African Health Care

    12-1, 2-101 NHH
    This forum features three professionals conducting work and research in different regions of Africa and on very different aspects of health and health care. Each of them will talk about their work, with an emphasis on how ethics informs it and how their work derives new questions about what ethics means, for whom, and why. After discussion among the three, we encourage audience participation in continuing to debate the meaning of ethics, and how the many issues relating to health care across Africa push us to consider ethics in new ways. Visit the Center for Bioethics website for more information.

  • April 4, 2016: Save the date!: The 12th Annual Women’s Health Research Conference: Environmental Exposures and Hormones: Implications for Health

    1-5 p.m., Coffman Theater, Coffman Memorial Union
    Registration opens November 16, 2015.

    Read more and submit an abstract.

  • April 25, 2016: Save the Date:  Minnesota HPV Vaccination Summit

    The Masonic Cancer Center's Gynecologic Oncology Translational Working Group (Gyn Onc TWG) brings together cancer experts and healthcare leaders with one goal in mind: maximizing the success of research for the prevention and treatment of gynecologic cancers. Mark your calendar for Monday, April 25, 2016, for the Gyn Onc TWG's Minnesota HPV Vaccination Summit at the University of Minnesota.

    Based on the same format as the national HPV vaccination summit held by the National Cancer Institute and Center for Disease Control last month at the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, this day-long meeting will feature state and national HPV vaccination and cancer-prevention experts. We invite all of our interprofessional team of faculty and students, as well as partners from across Minnesota to actively participate in this historic cancer prevention summit.

    More information to follow.

  • May 9-10, 2016: Register Now! Germline Genetic Risk of Childhood Cancer: Where Do We Go From Here?

    Hyatt Regency, Minneapolis

    A 1.5 day symposium at the University of Minnesota to immediately precede the American Society for Pediatric Hematology/Oncology meeting in Minneapolis in May.

    Topics will include:

    • High-penetrance variants - what is known and what is left to be discovered?
    • Common variation - what is it telling us about the biology of carcinogenesis?
    • The role of de novo mutation in childhood cancer.
    • Is GxE interaction possible to examine in childhood cancer?
    • Functional genomics approaches for childhood cancer
    • Moving germline genomics into practice through prediction, screening, and possibly prevention

    Guest speakers currently on the agenda:

    • James Amatruda, M.D., Ph.D., Department of Pediatrics, Molecular Biology and Internal Medicine, UT Southwestern Medical Center
    • David Gutmann, M.D., Ph.D., Department of Neurology, Washington University in St. Louis
    • Branden Moriarity, Ph.D., Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota
    • Chad Myers, Ph.D., Computer Science and Engineering, University of Minnesota
    • Kenan Onel, M.D., Ph.D., Department of Pediatrics, University of Chicago
    • Andrew Olshan, PhD, Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill
    • Kaitlin Samocha, B.A., Graduate Student, Biological and Biomedical Sciences Program, Harvard
    • University
    • Jakub Tolar, M.D., Ph.D., Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota
    • Kyle Walsh, Ph.D., Neurological Surgery and Epidemiology and Biostatistics, UCSF
    • Joseph Wiemels, PhD, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, UCSF

    American Medical Association/PRA
    The University of Minnesota is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    American Medical Association (AMA) Credit Designation Statement
    This activity has been approved for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Determination of exact number of credits is pending.

    REGISTRATION IS FREE. Register online at http://bit.ly/1Pl2akV

    Attendance is limited to 100 persons

    Contact person: Ginny Oie; email: oie@umn.edu

    More information will be available on the Department of Pediatric's Epidemiology and Clinical Research website.

  • May 9-10, 2016: 3rd Minnesota Neuro-Oncology Symposium

    The mission of this Symposium is to educate researchers, clinicians, students, trainees, patients, caregivers, and community members on current and developing therapies for brain and nervous system tumors.

    The Symposium with include two comprehensive programs designed to accommodate the specific interests of all those dedicated to finding a cure for brain tumors. The Research/Provider Program will present highly scientific content intended for researchers, physicians, students, and trainees. The Patient/Caregiver Program will present more practical information to patients, families, caregivers, and other community members with an interest in neuro-oncology.

    See more at http://www.peds.umn.edu/hematology-oncology/brain-tumor-program/symposium/index.htm.

  • May 18-20, 2016: Save the date!: Midwest Tumor Microenvironment Meeting

    The Masonic Cancer Center is hosting the Midwest Tumor Microenvironment Meeting May 18-20, 2016. The conference goal is to leverage the strength of tumor microenvironment researchers in the Midwest to re-engineer the tumor microenvironment to improve tumor therapy/normalize the tumor microenvironment. Read more.

  • June 30, 2016: SAVE THE DATE! John Kersey, M.D. Lecture

    Alan Ashworth, Ph.D., FRS
    E. Dixon Heise Distinguished Professor in Oncology, University of California San Francisco
    President, UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center
    Senior Vice President for Cancer Services, UCSF Health
    Professor of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine

  • November 2-3, 2016: SAVE THE DATE: 7th Annual Masonic Cancer Center Research Symposium

    TCF Bank Stadium
    The 7th Annual Masonic Cancer Center Research Symposium is being held in honor of Lee Wattenberg, M.D.

    Keynote Speaker:
    The 2016 B.J. Kennedy Lecturer in Medical Oncology
    Thomas Kensler, Ph.D., Professor, Environmental Health Sciences, Bloomberg School of Public Health; Professor Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine; Professor of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, University of Pittsburgh

    Registration and schedule information will be available later in the year.

Events
  • February 20, 2016: Cancer and the Human Body

    12-4 p.m., Science Museum of Minnesota, 120 W. Kellogg Blvd., St. Paul, Minn.

    For 16 years the Masonic Cancer Center has partnered with The Science Museum of Minnesota to highlight the science of cancer research. Researchers from the Masonic Cancer Center develop interactive displays to explain what cancer is and looks like and what they are doing that could lead to better ways to find, treat and beat cancer. This takes place in the Human Body exhibit area and is open to anyone who pays admission to the Science Museum for that afternoon.

    Participants can:

    compare normal cells to cancer cells
    see different types of cancers in human tissues
    find out how dogs and zebra fish help us learn more about cancer in humans
    learn about bone marrow matching and donation for treatment of cancers
    see if you have damage to your skin due to sun exposure or tanning beds

  • March 7 - April 4, 2016: Mini Medical School - Breakthroughs in Cancer Research and Treatment

    Mondays, 6-8:30 p.m., for 5 weeks, Malcolm Moos Health Sciences Tower, Room 2-650, 515 Delaware St. SE, Minneapolis, MN  55455 

    Mini Medical School has partnered with the Masonic Cancer Center at the University of Minnesota to bring some of the best researchers and clinicians to share exciting advances in cancer research. Learn how their work is helping find new treatments and cures for patients and improving the quality of life for survivors.

    Join us for the spring 2016 session of Mini Medical School, “Breakthroughs in Cancer Research, Detection and Treatment,” to learn from world-renowned experts in the Academic Health Center and the Masonic Cancer Center. Speakers from across our health sciences schools will discuss discoveries in cancer treatment and care. Explore topics including: key concepts in cancer and cancer research; aberrant cell signaling; genetic mechanisms; and the latest in diagnosing, treating and preventing cancer—all discussed by University of Minnesota researchers and clinicians in public health, medicine, pharmacy, dentistry, nursing and veterinary medicine.

    Learn about these issues and more at Mini Medical School’s 34th session!

    Early Registration: Dec 22 - Jan 31: $60 for all registrants

    Registration Cost: Feb 1 - Mar 7:
    $80 - General Public
    $65 - U of M Faculty/Staff/Students and UMAA Members
    $65 - Fairview and UM Physicians Employees
    $65 - Students

    For more information, visit http://www.health.umn.edu/about/mini-medical-school. Contact 612-624-5100 or minimed@umn.edu with questions.

  • April 23, 2016: Registration is open for the 11th Annual Cancer Survivorship Conference

    Saturday, April 23, 2016
    8 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
    McNamara Alumni Center, University of Minnesota

    A cancer diagnosis can alter the landscape of your life. Although it doesn't redefine you, it can change your lifetime health care needs. Save the date for this free educational conference that focuses on questions and issues survivors and their families often face after cancer treatment or following stem-cell transplantation.

    The event is free but registration is required. Please register on the website: http://bit.ly/1O1f0mz

  • May 5-7, 2016: Promoting Health Equity: Engage. Inform. Act. Conference

    Commons Hotel, Minneapolis

    This will be an action oriented conference focused on building and showcasing partnerships, research, programs, and policies to promote health equity across the region.

    Who should participate: Community organizations, community members, public health and health care practitioners, and researchers seeking to build solutions to health inequities through partnership.

    Registration is now open. Visit the website.
     

  • May 9-10, 2016: 3rd Neuro-Oncology Program

    The mission of this Symposium is to educate researchers, clinicians, students, trainees, patients, caregivers, and community members on current and developing therapies for brain and nervous system tumors.

    The Symposium with include two comprehensive programs designed to accommodate the specific interests of all those dedicated to finding a cure for brain tumors. The Patient/Caregiver Program will present more practical information to patients, families, caregivers, and other community members with an interest in neuro-oncology.

    See more at http://www.peds.umn.edu/hematology-oncology/brain-tumor-program/symposium/index.htm.

  • July 30, 2016: 2016 Marrow on the Move

    Lake Nokomis, Minneapolis

    Sponsored by the University of Minnesota Blood and Marrow Transplant Program

    Contact: marrowonthemove@umn.edu, 612-625-8942

Community Education & Outreach
  • Minnesota Cancer Alliance

    The Minnesota Cancer Alliance (MCA) is a coalition of health care organizations, community-based groups, and volunteers that created and is now implementing Cancer Plan Minnesota. The plan provides a comprehensive and cohesive approach for coordinating cancer control and prevention activities in the state. Cancer is now the number one cause of death in Minnesota.

    Cancer Plan Minnesota 2011-2016 is the state's second comprehensive cancer control plan created to reduce the cancer burden among all Minnesotans. As a framework for action, this plan contains measurable objectives and will help guide the members of the Minnesota Cancer Alliance in their fights against cancer in Minnesota.

    Key objectives and strategies focus on the continuum of cancer control from prevention to early detection and treatment to survivorship and end of life. Cancer Plan Minnesota 2011-2016 provides a framework for action for planners, providers, policymakers, the public health community and other advocates playing a key role in bringing Cancer Plan Minnesota to fruition.

    The Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota is playing a key role in bringing Cancer Plan Minnesota to fruition. The Masonic Cancer Center has an MCA advisory council whose goals are to:

    • develop communication networks that provide information about the Minnesota Cancer Alliance to Masonic Cancer Center members;
    • inform members about potential research projects that might lead to funding and papers, and
    • integrate Minnesota Cancer Alliance priorities into Masonic Cancer Center projects.

    Program Liaison:
    Kiara Ellis
    Masonic Cancer Center
    Email: malon243@umn.edu
    Phone: 612-624-4099
    Office: 760B MCRB

  • Cancer and the Human Body

    Science Museum of Minnesota, 120 W. Kellogg Blvd., St. Paul, Minn. 

    For 16 years the Masonic Cancer Center has partnered with The Science Museum of Minnesota to highlight the science of cancer research. Researchers from the Masonic Cancer Center develop interactive displays to explain what cancer is and looks like and what they are doing that could lead to better ways to find, treat and beat cancer. This takes place in the Human Body exhibit area and is open to anyone who pays admission to the Science Museum for that afternoon.

    Participants can:

    • compare normal cells to cancer cells
    • see different types of cancers in human tissues
    • find out how dogs and zebra fish help us learn more about cancer in humans
    • learn about bone marrow matching and donation for treatment of cancers
    • see if you have damage to your skin due to sun exposure or tanning beds

    Visit the website. https://www.smm.org/cancer-and-human-body

  • Speakers and Health Fair Displays

     

    Speakers from the Masonic Cancer Center at the University of Minnesota are researchers who are discovering and developing new and better ways to prevent, diagnose, and treat cancer, as well as improving the quality of life for survivors. And while our speakers include some of the nation's top cancer experts, we promise to leave the technical jargon back at the lab.

     

    Topics include:

    • Scientific Breakthroughs
    • Preventing Cancer
    • Cancer Risk Reduction
    • Gene Therapy
    • Children and Cancer
    • Blood and Marrow Transplantation/Stem Cell Research
    • Clinical Trials
    • Cancer in Families
    • Survivorship
    • Immunotherapies/Cancer Vaccines/Monoclonal Antibodies

    Health Fair Displays

    A representative from the Masonic Cancer Center is available to come to your organization's health fair and distribute cancer information brochures. We also can bring a display that allows you to compare tissues affected by cancer with healthy tissues.

    To request a speaker, a health fair representative, or to receive more information, please call 612-624-2620 or e-mail ccinfo@umn.edu.

  • Masonic Cancer Center Tours

    The Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota provides tours for business groups, students, community organizations, and more. Walk the halls of our state-of-the-art facility and learn about the tools and equipment scientists use to make important discoveries.Learn more about cancer research being done to improve prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer. There is no charge for tours.

    Tours include: Overview presentation about the Masonic Cancer Center and general tour of the building.

    • In some cases, the cancer center can provide hands on activities for groups, such as DNA spooling.
    • Researchers also may be available to speak to tour groups.

    Tours are available to groups of 10 or more, including fraternal organizations, youth groups, seniors' groups, etc. First priority for tours will be given to groups that have hosted speakers from the cancer center and school groups.

    • We ask that groups request a tour at least six weeks in advance.
    • Groups will receive a response regarding whether their tour request can be accommodated no later than two weeks from the day the request is made.

    For more information, please call 612-624-2620 or e-mail ccinfo@umn.edu.

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  • Last modified on February 10, 2016